The various cross-sectional element of roads and highways are shown in the fig.1 and their explanation is given below:

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  • Carriage Way

It is the way where the vehicles move. It may be a single lane two-way, double lane one-way, double lane two way or multi laneway.

  • Shoulder

It accommodates the stopped vehicle and provides lateral support to the pavement.

  • Road Way Width

It is also known as the formation width or simply roadway as shown in fig. It is the way that includes carriageway and shoulder.

  • Road Land Width

Most commonly known as Right Off Way (ROW). It is around 30-45 meter. It is measured such that there is clearance for the vehicles. Any building, trees, shops or anything of such sort is not present there. It is provided for overall safety purpose.

  • Road Land / Way Boundary

It represents the line on either side of the road/highway up to which activity of any kind, is not permitted.

  • Building Line

Building line represents the line on either side of the road/highway up to which no building activity is permitted. Distance between the building line on either side is around 80 meters.

  • Control Line

It is the line beyond the building line up to which nature of the building is controlled. Here, a temporary activity can be permitted, like the dumping of building materials. Distance between control line is around 150 meters for NH (national highway).

  • Camber

It is the slight slope provided on carriageway and shoulder way to drain-off water. It is a must so that the water doesn’t erode off the roadway.

  • Median / Divider

The purpose of this cross-sectional element is to prevent head-on collision of vehicles on the road. The width of the median for the highway is 5 meter, for restricted land is 3 meter and for bridges is 1.2-1.5 meter.

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Teresa Patel

Teresa Patel

Teresa Patel is pursuing her Bachelors in Civil Engineering. She is an active member of an NGO, Karwaan, Jabalpur. She is a dendrophile person who wanders into nature to find inspiration for writing. When not writing, binge-watching thriller and solving puzzles are her best past time. She's an engineer in making, working her way up.

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