Finally, we may account for all the normal universe’s matter. According to the cosmologists, almost half of the normal universe matter – the matter which forms stars, planets and even the human body exists in the intergalactic space. But it’s not confirmed yet.

To weigh the intergalactic matter, a study used the powerful millisecond long pulses of radio waves, called fast radio bursts (FRBs).

For 20 years, our cosmologists were looking out for some hint of the missing matter.

An astrophysicist at the University of Amsterdam, Jason Hessel says, “But we haven’t been able to detect it very well, because it’s really, really diffuse, and it’s not shining brightly.”

Researchers have suspected the missing matter along filaments of gas strung between galaxy clusters for a long time.

Some intergalactic matter was detected by its way of absorbing the distant light, bright objects known to be quasars. But only FRBs from other galaxies can help to reveal the entire matter hanging out in intergalactic space.

Even though the cause of far radio burst remains a mystery, these can be useful to detect the intergalactic matter. A high frequency and high energy radio springs through intergalactic matter, faster than its low-frequency waves.

Five fast radio bursts were examined by the astrophysicist J. Xavier, Santa Cruz and colleagues. All five FRBs were detected by the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder.

“Five is an awfully small number,” cautions astrophysicist J. Michael Shull of the Univesity of Colorado Boulder. He adds, “Once they get their error bars beaten down with many, many more bursts … I think that will really be the nail in the coffin on this baryon problem.”

Right now, all we know is that lost universe matter is between the galaxies and with several bursts observation, we can start tracing to map out the cosmic web.

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